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Tanzania

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By adequately funding supply of renewable energy technologies to off and on-grid communities, Tanzania would be assured of seeing a boost in its war against its arch-enemies—poverty, disease and ignorance.
Renewable energy stakeholders have said the challenge of access to the finance is hampering the supply of renewable energy technologies to off-grid communities for developmental activities, especially in agriculture. Solar energy is not only meant for lighting homes, instead, it serve in businesses and help improve agricultural activities.
Agriculture in Tanzania consumes more than 90 percent of the water, with most of it using inefficient gravity open canal and flooding or basin technologies. Some of the irrigation schemes are dilapidated after they were built a long time ago without undergoing maintenance and others were affected by floods in recent years.
@Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment
Access to affordable and reliable clean electricity services is critical in making communities less vulnerable to future climate and public health crises. The off-grid energy industry in East Africa has contributed to substantial progress and innovation in electrifying households and businesses.
U of T Engineering PhD candidate Karlye Wong (CivMin) is working with the Geita and Nyanghwale District Councils in northern Tanzania to develop an affordable, low-maintenance, off-grid solution for delivering clean drinking water — one that could significantly improve local health outcomes.
The Project, which is jointly funded by the Mwanza (Tanzania) and Wurzburg (Germany) cities and implemented by Tanzania Renewable Energy Association (TAREA), is aimed at discouraging the use of harmful fishing tools, hence, protecting Lake Victoria’s biodiversity in general.
The Project, which is jointly funded by the Mwanza (Tanzania) and Wurzburg (Germany) cities and implemented by Tanzania Renewable Energy Association (TAREA), is aimed at discouraging the use of harmful fishing tools, hence, protecting Lake Victoria’s biodiversity in general.
The Rwandan Community in Tanzania has contributed $7,500 towards the Rwandan Development Bank’s #CanaChallenge Programme to light up 500 families’ homes. The campaign was organised considering that there was low utilisation of Renewable Energy Fund (REF) loans especially among needy families.

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